MARIO MOTHER#(#%)@N’ CHALMERS!


If there’s anything I enjoyed more than watching the Heat go up 3-1 in the NBA finals and take a step closer to taking a massive dump in collective America’s cornflakes, it’s when the prudish ABC censors, still reeling from Janet Jackson’s Superbowl Titty-gate a few years back, were caught napping after the game and they aired Dwayne Wade dropping 2 M-F bombs in the tunnel.

You see, prudish America, besides just hating the Miami Heat and everything they stand for (having a choice where to go play, winning, and not living in f-#ing Cleveland), also just can’t handle the idea of swear words being uttered in the heat of a competitive NBA game. Of course for years this was never an issue, until Janet Jackson’s boobie flipped everyone the f-ck out and made all the Puritans grab their pitchforks..

 

The Horror..

 

So imagine my delight when Dwayne Wade was caught extolling the virtues of his teammate’s great game, by saying, heard clearly, “MARIO MOTHERF*CKIN’ CHALMERS!.” Not once, but twice. Great stuff. Here’s some video.. the fun starts at the 0:22 mark:

RIP Trolololol man… AKA Eduard Khil


Trolololol

 

Eduard Khil, Mr Trololo, has died. He was 77. He became an internet sensation when his made for Soviet-TV video from 1976 went viral a few years ago. As the story goes, he heard his grandson humming the song one day after school, and asked where he heard that. His grandson told him he was internet sensation, and he was, as you might expect, incredulous.

At first Mr. Khil was very skeptical, thinking everyone was making fun of him and the song, which of course we were. But at the same time the tune was catchy, and the character endearing. Eventually Mr. Khil became pragmatic and took on good humor about his new-found fame, embracing his internet stardom and even coming out of retirement to perform his smash hit..

And there’s a real Cold War-era twist to how the song came about, and why it became as famous as it was. Although some accounts vary, there seems to be consistency behind the true etiology of “Trololol,” originally a song entitled: (translated, obviously) “I Am Glad, ‘Cause I’m Finally Returning Back Home.”

The song was an ode to the old American West, with wildly provocative pro-American lyrics, about a cowboy riding home to his wife who is knitting him socks. Well, it was provocative enough that the Soviet censors rejected the lyrics. And in what seems to have been a statement of political protest and irony, Khil and his producer decided to record the song, sans lyrics, but with the famous “Trololol.” The deranged laughter has still never been explained.

So, one more time, the Trololol man.. enjoy